A Girl Who Dances In Rain...

Ask me anything   Submit   I am so many things...I'm complex and uncomplicated...avant garde and traditional...elaborate and simple...elegant and "out there"...wise and sometimes foolish...emotional and logical...hot and cold...black and white...hard line and accommodating...I'm so many things. Yet, I'm simple...I'm just me. I dance like nobody's watching and love like it's never going to hurt. An ISTJ trying to make it in a world full of everyone else. ~The Girl Formerly Known As Ashlee



twitter.com/Sankofa_Phoenix:

    Shrimp and grits, pancetta, truffle oil and an egg mmm mmm good

    Shrimp and grits, pancetta, truffle oil and an egg mmm mmm good

    — 13 hours ago
    Don’t like stocking with sandals, but this has a nice effect

    Don’t like stocking with sandals, but this has a nice effect

    — 22 hours ago
    REPOST FROM @revolutionary_mindset:  
“I have a dream that one day children in seventh grade will have an American history textbook that is not like my son’s. Its heroes will not just be people from the past who upheld the middle-class values of modesty, chastity, sobriety, thrift, and industry. The rebels it celebrates will include not only abolitionists, suffragists, labor unionists, and civil rights leaders who confined their protests to peaceful and respectable writing, speaking, striking, and marching. In my dream, schoolchildren will read about people like C.O. Chinn.

Chinn was a black man in Canton, Mississippi, who in the 1960s owned a farm, a rhythm and blues nightclub, a bootlegging operation, and a large collection of pistols, rifles, and shotguns with which he threatened local Klansmen and police when they attempted to encroach on his businesses or intimidate civil rights activists working to desegregate Canton and register black residents to vote. After one confrontation, in which a pistol-packing Chinn forced the notoriously racist and brutal local sheriff to stand down inside the county courthouse during a hearing for a civil rights worker, the lawman admitted, “There are only two bad sons of bitches in this county: me and that nigger C.O. Chinn.” Although the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE) and the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) were formally committed to nonviolence, when their volunteers showed up in Canton they happily received protection from Chinn and the militia of armed black men he managed. “Every white man in that town knew you didn’t fuck with C.O. Chinn,” remembered a CORE activist. “He’d kick your natural ass.” Consequently, Chinn’s Club Desire offered a safe haven for black performers such as B.B. King, James Brown, Hank Ballard and the Midnighters, and the Platters; illegal liquor flowed freely in the county; and, unlike their comrades in much of Mississippi, CORE and SNCC activists in Canton were able to register thousands of black voters with virtual impunity from segregationist violence.” 
(via #RepostWhiz @RepostWhiz app)

    REPOST FROM @revolutionary_mindset:
    “I have a dream that one day children in seventh grade will have an American history textbook that is not like my son’s. Its heroes will not just be people from the past who upheld the middle-class values of modesty, chastity, sobriety, thrift, and industry. The rebels it celebrates will include not only abolitionists, suffragists, labor unionists, and civil rights leaders who confined their protests to peaceful and respectable writing, speaking, striking, and marching. In my dream, schoolchildren will read about people like C.O. Chinn.

    Chinn was a black man in Canton, Mississippi, who in the 1960s owned a farm, a rhythm and blues nightclub, a bootlegging operation, and a large collection of pistols, rifles, and shotguns with which he threatened local Klansmen and police when they attempted to encroach on his businesses or intimidate civil rights activists working to desegregate Canton and register black residents to vote. After one confrontation, in which a pistol-packing Chinn forced the notoriously racist and brutal local sheriff to stand down inside the county courthouse during a hearing for a civil rights worker, the lawman admitted, “There are only two bad sons of bitches in this county: me and that nigger C.O. Chinn.” Although the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE) and the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) were formally committed to nonviolence, when their volunteers showed up in Canton they happily received protection from Chinn and the militia of armed black men he managed. “Every white man in that town knew you didn’t fuck with C.O. Chinn,” remembered a CORE activist. “He’d kick your natural ass.” Consequently, Chinn’s Club Desire offered a safe haven for black performers such as B.B. King, James Brown, Hank Ballard and the Midnighters, and the Platters; illegal liquor flowed freely in the county; and, unlike their comrades in much of Mississippi, CORE and SNCC activists in Canton were able to register thousands of black voters with virtual impunity from segregationist violence.”
    (via #RepostWhiz @RepostWhiz app)

    — 22 hours ago
    #repostwhiz 
    C’mon chair

    C’mon chair

    — 22 hours ago
    Have mercy. I don’t do celebrity crushes for real…but THIS man right here. #speechless He is the epitome of sexy…he rocketh all things well, he maketh all things good. I’m gonna sow a seed into the Omari ministry.

    Have mercy. I don’t do celebrity crushes for real…but THIS man right here. #speechless He is the epitome of sexy…he rocketh all things well, he maketh all things good. I’m gonna sow a seed into the Omari ministry.

    — 22 hours ago
    #speechless 
    Yes 🙌🙌🙌💃💃💃

    Yes 🙌🙌🙌💃💃💃

    — 22 hours ago